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8/26/2015
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Windows 10: 75 Million Downloads And Counting

Microsoft's newest operating system experiences intense growth, surpassing 75 million installs one month after launch.

Windows 10 Vs. Windows 7: What Enterprise IT Needs To Know
Windows 10 Vs. Windows 7: What Enterprise IT Needs To Know
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

Microsoft announced on Aug. 26 that its Windows 10 operating system has surpassed 75 million installs following its July 29 launch. 

Since its release, Windows 10 has been downloaded on more than 90,000 unique PC or tablet models, reported VP of marketing for Windows and devices Yusuf Mehdi on his Twitter account and the Windows blog.

The current number of devices running on Windows 10 includes PCs located in 192 countries across the globe, some of which were manufactured as early as 2007.

[More on Microsoft: SharePoint 2016 Enters IT Preview.]

The popularity of Windows 10 has driven growth in the redesigned Windows Store, which serves as a one-stop shop for Microsoft's universal apps. Since Windows 10 launched the Store has seen six times more app downloads per device than it did for Windows 8, Mehdi noted.

A successful first month for Windows 10 is welcome news to Microsoft, which is largely relying on the new OS for a profitable 2016 fiscal year. At this year's Worldwide Partner Conference, COO Kevin Turner listed Windows 10 among core priorities like a stronger commitment to cloud, intensifying competition, and customer satisfaction.

Windows 10 is "the best enterprise [OS] release we've ever released in the history of the company," Turner said in his keynote. Key Windows 10 features, including the updated Windows Store, mobility of experiences, a single app platform, and new hardware, will combine to mark a "seminal moment" for Microsoft.

The new OS marks a fundamental change in how Microsoft operates and distributes Windows, a reflection of its stronger focus on cloud and mobility. Windows 10 operates similarly across PCs, tablets, and smartphones. The existence of Windows-as-a-Service means customers will download new features and fixes via Windows Update.

(Image: Yusuf Mehdi via Twitter)

(Image: Yusuf Mehdi via Twitter)

Microsoft is a longstanding tech giant trying to modernize in a mobile-first, cloud-first world. It hopes the new Windows 10 strategy will help it better compete among today's up-and-coming innovators. In order to get customers on board with its plan, Redmond is offering a free upgrade from Windows 7 and Windows 8 devices for one year following the Windows 10 release.

If today's numbers are any indication, customers seem to be taking the bait.

Windows 10 may be experiencing some rapid growth now, but it has a long way to go. Microsoft aims to have the OS running on one billion devices within two or three years of its July 29 release. It's a lofty goal. The company will need to sell many new Windows 10 devices, and convince businesses and consumers to upgrade, in order to achieve it.

With its current adoption rate, this goal is within reach -- but can Windows 10 maintain its momentum?

Kelly Sheridan is Associate Editor at Dark Reading. She started her career in business tech journalism at Insurance & Technology and most recently reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft and business IT. Sheridan earned her BA at Villanova University. View Full Bio

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Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
10/5/2015 | 6:03:37 AM
Re: The Unbridled Enthusiasm of Kevin Turner
Taimoor,

I am sure you realize that this is a risky strategy for Microsoft (given that Windows and Office Franchises represent their two main Cash Revenue Generators) to virtually give everything away for free ensures that they will have to scramble for revenues bigtime here.

By giving only Home Users Free Upgrades on the other hand;they force Enterprises (whose end-users may have experienced Windows 10 at home) to upgrade their Enterprise machines as well.

Atleast that's the way MSFT is thinking currently.

Will it work?

We need to wait and watch for sometime more.

 
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2015 | 2:45:28 PM
Re: The Unbridled Enthusiasm of Kevin Turner
"Upgrading Enterprise Versions of Windows is not Free (atleast not here in America) currently"

@Ashu001: I think the bulk of the users are going to be the enterprise users so I don't see why Microsoft would wait them wait. It's easy to convert all of them into Win 10 as only the enterprise agreements need to be revised. I wonder what this delay will result into.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
9/6/2015 | 11:11:28 AM
Re: The Unbridled Enthusiasm of Kevin Turner
Taimoor,

Upgrading Enterprise Versions of Windows is not Free (atleast not here in America) currently.

I have''nt had the oppurtunity to look at how it works out Globally currently.

 
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 10:32:55 PM
Re: The Unbridled Enthusiasm of Kevin Turner
 

"Most Companies(who have Windows 7 Enterprise Version) are unwilling to make the move to Windows 10 Enterprise because they just don't want to spend extra cash on these upgrades today."

 

@Ashu001: From what I read, the upgrades are free for all users including the enterprise ones. What is the amount that enterprise IT has to spend in upgrading then? Is there some hidden cost that we're talking about here?
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 10:31:17 PM
Re: Windows 10: Free as in Free ? Sure I'll Take It....
 

"Windows 10 is a good OS (in my experience using it) but I think the free upgrade and option to roll back played a big part in the 75 million milestone.

@Kelly: I think the free upgrade is a very smart move by Microsoft. It tells us that the company is well aware of the changing market situation and how the revenue models need to be refined. In the OS market, you can no longer make up front money from selling the software. You have to devise an alternate earning mechanism, which is what Microsoft is looking to do now. Let's see how successful it will be in terms of profitability.
tzubair
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tzubair,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2015 | 10:28:44 PM
Upgrade on Mobile
Windows 10 on the desktop is a great experience. I have personally enjoyed it and found it to be much better than Windows 8.1. However, Microsoft needs to release the mobile version of Windows 10 soon, as promised. The sooner they upgrade the devices, the higher is the chance that it will be able to sustiain the mobile users who are slowly moving away from Windows to Android an iOS.
Kelly22
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Kelly22,
User Rank: Strategist
8/31/2015 | 12:25:45 PM
Re: Windows 10: Free as in Free ? Sure I'll Take It....
It's hard to know for sure, but I'd guess Microsoft would not be near 75 million downloads if not for the free upgrade. After all the issues with Windows 8, it needed to offer a powerful incentive for people to download. Windows 10 is a good OS (in my experience using it) but I think the free upgrade and option to roll back played a big part in the 75 million milestone.
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2015 | 10:45:28 AM
Re: Windows 10: Free as in Free ? Sure I'll Take It....
Durbin,

You still have some really old,working PCs???

Wow!

You most certainly are lucky.

If I see PCs in my company which last more than 5-7 years I feel so so Happy about it!!!

LOL!

Those old upgrades are definitely not happening.

No Doubts about it!

 
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2015 | 9:14:09 AM
Re: The Unbridled Enthusiasm of Kevin Turner
Durbin,

Thanks for sharing your honest&candid opinion here.

This is what I am also observing in my work as an SMB IT Consultant.

Most Companies(who have Windows 7 Enterprise Version) are unwilling to make the move to Windows 10 Enterprise because they just don't want to spend extra cash on these upgrades today.

Given how tough the recessionary environment is Globally I really don't blame them either.

Why fix something which ain't broken?

 

 
Ashu001
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Ashu001,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2015 | 9:06:57 AM
Re: Windows 10 in the workplace
gcarlisle,

I am pretty sure if you went to MSFT with your issues (in this space) they will very politely say-We are working on it or something like that.

When the Ground reality is primarily this when you get offered something for free there has to be a catch somewhere in there and/or they will make you hard to get it for free.

This is the basic law in most Markets today and One should not be really surprised same thing applies in Software as well.

 
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
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