11 Tips For Successful Self-Service BI And Analytics - InformationWeek

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3/21/2016
11:06 AM
Lisa Morgan
Lisa Morgan
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11 Tips For Successful Self-Service BI And Analytics

As more businesses attempt to compete with data, more people within their organizations must be able to gain insight from it. End-user requirements are changing rapidly, often at a faster pace than their employers' ability to deliver sound solutions. Here are a few ways to avoid compromising long-term benefits for short-term gains.
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Lead By Example 

Culture is one of the biggest factors separating data-driven companies from their traditional counterparts. However, having self-service capabilities in place is only valuable if people in the organization are using them. At Ace Hardware, the directive to use data in everyday decision-making comes from the top. 
'Years ago, [self-service capabilities] were in pockets in the company. Now we have more of an emphasis from our leadership that there are numbers out there and we can be a better company if we're using them, so we have adoption pretty much across the board,' said Tim Brynda, a software engineering consultant at Ace Hardware, in an interview.     
In 2014, Ace Hardware employees consumed 162 billion lines of report data. Apparently, people in the company disdain top-level numbers and executive summaries. They want detailed data, Brynda said.   
(Image: CreativeMagic via Pixabay)

Lead By Example

Culture is one of the biggest factors separating data-driven companies from their traditional counterparts. However, having self-service capabilities in place is only valuable if people in the organization are using them. At Ace Hardware, the directive to use data in everyday decision-making comes from the top.

"Years ago, [self-service capabilities] were in pockets in the company. Now we have more of an emphasis from our leadership that there are numbers out there and we can be a better company if we're using them, so we have adoption pretty much across the board," said Tim Brynda, a software engineering consultant at Ace Hardware, in an interview.

In 2014, Ace Hardware employees consumed 162 billion lines of report data. Apparently, people in the company disdain top-level numbers and executive summaries. They want detailed data, Brynda said.

(Image: CreativeMagic via Pixabay)

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