Debunking 8 Big Data and Analytics Myths - InformationWeek
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Debunking 8 Big Data and Analytics Myths

As with other emerging tech concepts, big data and analytics are haunted by myths. Here are eight such myths that you will want to dispel as you advance your analytics strategy.
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Keep all your data; you might need it one day

Image: Pixabay
Image: Pixabay

One of the biggest myths to come about during the early days of the big data movement is that enterprise organizations should hold onto every scrap of data that could ever be collected. For those who went down that path, they were met with the task of figuring out where to store data at the lowest cost. Many sought out cloud-based data archiving technologies such as Amazon Glacier or Google Coldline Storage. While these technologies are indeed excellent low-cost solutions for data archiving for disaster recovery, it’s not the right place for data analytics. Ultimately, it was discovered that the true benefits of big data come in the real-time analysis and reporting of recently procured information.

Andrew has well over a decade of enterprise networking under his belt through his consulting practice, which specializes in enterprise network architectures and datacenter build-outs and prior experience at organizations such as State Farm Insurance, United Airlines and the ... View Full Bio

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ndeaa
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ndeaa,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/4/2017 | 1:41:28 AM
Debunking 8 big data and Analytics myths
Very insightful information on Bigdata and anaytics!With an emphasis on predictive analytics, it is important to provide customers with the ability to move beyond simple reactive operations and into proactive activities that help plan for the future and identify new areas of business. Predictive models use known results to develop (or train) a model that can be used to predict values for different or new data. Modeling provides results in the form of predictions that represent a probability of the target variable (for example, revenue) based on estimated significance from a set of input variables.
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