News
3/24/2015
08:06 AM
Connect Directly
Facebook
LinkedIn
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail

11 Office 2013 Shortcuts That Will Change Your Life

Think you know everything there is to know about Microsoft Office? Take a look at 11 hidden features that will make you the envy of your co-workers.



(Image: Created in a lab environment, logo credits throughout, Microsoft)

(Image: Created in a lab environment, logo credits throughout, Microsoft)

Microsoft Office 2013 users know the suite is bundled with a wide range of productivity features that help them perform day-to-day activities efficiently. Yet, as often as we use Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, and other applications in our day-to-day lives, there are a large number of hidden or lesser-known features in Office 2013 that are extremely useful, but that many people aren't taking advantage of.

Many of us are even using third-party applications to do functions that we could more quickly and efficiently do right within the Office suite. For example, did you know that you could instantly add screenshots, YouTube videos, or Facebook images to your documents, right from within Office?

Were you aware Word serves as a calculator, allowing you to do arithmetic without switching to a calculator app or Excel? Do you know how to instantly and automatically compare different versions of the same document to see what changes your bosses, co-workers, or clients want you to make, without switching between tabs or reading each version line-by-line?

On the following pages, we give you information and directions on 11 lesser-known Office 2013 features that will increase productivity, add value to your work, and make you more efficient, not to mention give you the title of resident Office 2013 expert in your own office.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Email This  | 
Print  | 
RSS
More Insights
Copyright © 2021 UBM Electronics, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service