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Feature

I.T. Jobs: Money Isn't The Only Issue

To keep turnover and its effects to a minimum, human resources and company executives must understand what causes workers to seek employment opportunities elsewhere.
Recruitment and orientation costs are just part of the expenses companies incur when seeking to fill job vacancies. Lost productivity as new workers get up to speed, dips in employee output, and the morale of remaining workers are other side effects businesses face when key employees leave.

To keep turnover and its effects to a minimum, human resources and company executives must understand what causes workers to seek employment opportunities elsewhere. For insight into why IT professionals move on, InformationWeek Research asked 4,000-plus tech professionals seeking new jobs in its 2004 National IT Salary Survey why they're looking for a job change.

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Nearly two-thirds of the study's 2,219 IT staff members and 1,955 IT managers who want to job hop are doing so for more pay. Money, while still the prime reason for switching jobs, has declined in importance over the past three years. Salary increases--at least substantial raises--aren't always feasible in many cases. Other reasons for leaving are more addressable.

Seeking more challenge is a popular reason to change jobs. Two in five IT staffers and managers report that they're looking for more interesting work and the possibility of increased personal fulfillment in their employment search. A third of job seekers say they want more responsibility. Nearly half of managers and tech workers surveyed are seeking new positions as they no longer like their present companies' management or corporate culture, while one in five seek a more-dynamic company to work for.

What's your company doing to keep employee turnover at a minimum? Share your approaches at the address below.

Helen D'Antoni,
Senior Editor, Research
[email protected]


Settling For Less
What would influence you to accept a lesser position or title?

IT professionals are open to a job with less responsibility or a lower job title if the circumstances are right. Such a change would be acceptable to the participants in InformationWeek Research's 2004 National IT Salary Survey if it means more job satisfaction, increased job security, or if the position were with a better company. Two in five of managers and workers also say they would take a lesser post if the new job's location was more convenient than their current one.

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