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AT&T's iPhone Unlocking Policy Is Absolutely Unacceptable

Today AT&T announced the settlement details of a lawsuit regarding locked phones. Long story short, AT&T has agreed to unlock every phone it sells -- except for Apple's iPhone. I smell a new lawsuit in three, two, one...
Today AT&T announced the settlement details of a lawsuit regarding locked phones. Long story short, AT&T has agreed to unlock every phone it sells -- except for Apple's iPhone. I smell a new lawsuit in three, two, one...Sorry, AT&T and Apple, but this is utter crap.

I paid full retail price for the original iPhone in 2007 ($600), and it is still locked to AT&T's network. This is garbage and you know it. Nearly every single other phone on every single network around the world can be unlocked for free or a nominal fee after a specified period. Why is a phone that I bought three years ago for full price still locked to AT&T? It shouldn't be, plain and simple.

Here are the details from the lawsuit settlement agreement and the criteria that customers need to meet in order to qualify to have their phones unlocked:

1) Customers with postpaid accounts who have completed a minimum of 90 days of active service and are in good standing and current in their payments.

(2) Customers with prepaid accounts who have provided a detailed receipt or other proof of purchase of the handset.

(3) Customers who own handsets for which AT&T has an exclusive sales arrangement with a manufacturer of less than 10 months will have to wait until the 10-month period expires before they can receive an unlocking code.

If you want to opt out of the settlement or object to it, you have until June 4, 2010 to post mark your filing. The final approval hearing will be held July 2, 2010. For more information, visit www.attlockinglawsuits.com.

Hey, AT&T, consider this blog post my objection. I object strenuously. iPhones that are no longer subject to a contract should be unlocked. I don't care how long your exclusivity agreement is with Apple for sales of new iPhones. At the bare minimum, those users who've paid for their iPhone and met their contractual obligations have a right to fully access their property.

This policy is overly restrictive and unfair to customers. It's bull.

[Via The Consumerist]