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How Do You Reach Your CEO?

Hey CIOs, who do you report to? The CEO? The CFO? The COO? More importantly, who do you want to report to?
Hey CIOs, who do you report to? The CEO? The CFO? The COO? More importantly, who do you want to report to?The question is significant because it can reflect how efficiently your company runs.

A survey recently conducted by the Society for Information Management (SIM) indicates that fewer CIOs are reporting to their CEOs.

According to Baseline, last year 45 percent of the respondents to SIM's survey said the CIO in their company reported to their CEO while this year, that number is 31 percent.

Who are these CIO's talking to? The CFO or the COO. Baseline reports that "29 percent of respondents said the CIO reported to the CFO, compared with 25 percent last year, and 22 percent said the information chief reported to the COO, compared with 16 percent last year."

While Jerry Luftman, vice president of academic affairs at SIM, is quoted as saying that "the CEO isn't the only decision maker in a company and that CIOs can be just as successful when they report to other executives," he quickly adds that "it helps to have the CIO report to the CEO, and I have found that [in] those organizations where the CIO does report to the CEO, their alignment maturity is clearly ahead of those where they do not."

Of course, it all depends how a company is structured, but last time I checked, the big decisions, the important decisions, the decisions that matter, usually end with the CEO. If the CFO or the COO is presenting the CIO's case or even pleading the CIO's case, it's going to be way less effective than if the CIO can speak for his or herself.

The CIO's job is important enough to have a direct line to the guy in charge.

How does it work in your company? Who do you report to? Let us know.