Apple's Tim Cook Defends Encryption, Labor Practices In China - InformationWeek

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12/21/2015
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Apple's Tim Cook Defends Encryption, Labor Practices In China

Charlie Rose sat down with Tim Cook and other major players on the team at Apple for an in-depth look at the inner workings of the company during an interview on CBS's 60 Minutes.

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In what 60 Minutes called a "journey through the world's biggest and richest company," Charlie Rose spoke with Apple CEO Tim Cook and several members of the executive team. They covered topics ranging from taxes to terrorism.

As he has before, Cook again defended his refusal to allow government agencies access to consumers' encrypted messages, but noted the company is cooperating with authorities in other ways to combat terrorism.

"Here's the situation -- on your smartphone today, there's likely health information; there's financial information; there are intimate conversations with your family; there's probably business secrets," Cook said during the interview that aired Sunday, Dec. 20. "And you should probably have the ability to protect it. The only way we know how to do that is encrypt it. If there's a way to get in, somebody will find a way in."

Cook also expressed doubts about a so-called "back door," a surveillance term that would give government agencies -- and theoretically anyone smart enough to unlock it -- access to personal communications.

(Image: EdStock/iStockphoto)

(Image: EdStock/iStockphoto)

"There have been people that suggest that we should have a back door. But the reality is if you put a back door in, that back door's for everybody, for good guys and bad guys," Cook explained. "I don't believe that the trade-off here is privacy versus national security. I think that's an overly simplistic view. We're America. We should have both."

At the start of the interview Rose called Cook's leadership of the company, after he acceded to the CEO's post following the death of cofounder Steve Jobs, "one of the most challenging successions imaginable -- a daunting responsibility for the man he handpicked."

"I had never met anyone on the face of the planet like him before," Cook said of Jobs. "Not one. [Someone] who had this uncanny ability to see around the corner, who had this relentless, driving force for perfection."

Cook continued to testify to the unique genius that led to Apple's current position as the world's most valuable company.

"It's a bar of excellence that merely good isn't good enough. It has to be great -- as Steve used to say, insanely great," Cook said. "This is Steve's company. It is still Steve's company. It was born that way, it's still that way. I think his spirit will always be in the DNA of this company."

When Rose interviewed Apple design chief Jony Ive in the company's top secret product development studio, surrounded by grey blankets hiding the tops of work spaces, Ive affirmed the company's near-obsessive preoccupation with secrecy.

"We don't like people in this room, period," Ive said while trying to suppress a grin.

Indeed, later in the Cook interview, when he was asked about Apple's much-rumored Project Titan, thought to be an electric car, Cook laughed, noting, "One of the great things about Apple is probably we have more secrecy here than the CIA."

Cook also touched on the company's manufacturing presence in China, arguing it was a question of available skill sets, not cheap labor.

[Read about the myths and realities of the Steve Jobs movie.]

"I mean, you can take every tool and die maker in the United States and probably put them in a room that we're currently sitting in. In China, you would have to have multiple football fields," Cook said.

In an excerpt released before the full interview of Sunday, Cook spoke about how Apple pays its taxes and defended the company against what some call tax dodging, especially its keeping large amounts of cash overseas.

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Nathan Eddy is a freelance writer for InformationWeek. He has written for Popular Mechanics, Sales & Marketing Management Magazine, FierceMarkets, and CRN, among others. In 2012 he made his first documentary film, The Absent Column. He currently lives in Berlin. View Full Bio

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yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2015 | 7:14:35 AM
Re: Q & A
@jries: But that doesn't mean you have to refer to him on every TED talk or every interview. He is an idol, the public loves him, but that doesn't mean Tim Cook has the weight of Jobs on his shoulders because Cook is trying to move in a different direction that Jobs.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2015 | 7:07:52 AM
Re: Defence of labor practces in China
China hasn't had enough labour regulations and Apple took advantage of that. I wouldn't blame them since China and India are the places in Asia where people would work for you at the cheapest of cost.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2015 | 7:02:51 AM
Re: Q & A
@Technocrati: Indeed. Jobs had his uptime but that doesn't mean he needs periodic worshipping. His goals and ideals still remain in Apple's philosophy. Cook shouldn't follow Steve's footprints rather he should take some risks with the company and see where that takes him, if he wants history to remember him as a good CEO.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2015 | 7:00:15 AM
Re: Government backdoors. Really. Are you serious.
@DavidG047: Indeed. Encryption isn't fool proof and a back door may not be for everybody because companies can provide the government with working set of keys to decrypt their phones. Obviously the government won't share trade secrets with other governments.
yalanand
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yalanand,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2015 | 6:57:26 AM
Re: Q & A
@Technocrati: The more I see Cook squirm under heavy bombardment of questions the more I get fascinated by how he plays so close to the chest and still comes out unscarred. He actually acknowledged Apple's digital fight against terrorism and twists the words making us believe they aren't allowing government to spy on us.
ebyjeeby
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ebyjeeby,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/24/2015 | 12:04:59 PM
Not enough Tool & Die Makers?
What nonsense. Certainly there are cheaper tool & die makers in China. I don't know to what size room Cook referred, but I'm willing to bet the SF Bay Area has more than enough tool & die makers to fill it. I'm sure all of California does. There are > 20 in my smallish metro area in flyover country. 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
12/23/2015 | 12:38:00 AM
Re: Defence of labor practces in China
We're probably not seeing anything because there is no defense for the labor practices in China that Apple supports and makes  possible. "I know nothing, Noth - thing!" They don't fool anyone else, I wonder if they fool themselves?

 
Technocrati
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Technocrati,
User Rank: Ninja
12/22/2015 | 3:42:05 PM
Re: Q & A

@jries921   Oh I am sure it is heart felt.   What would Cook be doing if it weren't for Jobs ?   

 

I think it is safe to say, probably not running the World's most profitable company.   

jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
12/22/2015 | 3:03:25 PM
Re: Q & A
It is very possible that Mr. Cook's adminration of Steve Jobs is completely genuine.  While Jobs had his faults; his record as an entrepreneur, promoter, and designer may be unmatched in living memory.
jries921
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jries921,
User Rank: Ninja
12/22/2015 | 2:59:21 PM
Defence of labor practces in China
I was expecting more one one, given the headline.
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