Salesforce.com's New Big Buddy: Amazon - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
Cloud
Commentary
11/3/2008
04:51 PM
50%
50%

Salesforce.com's New Big Buddy: Amazon

Salesforce.com's been talking a lot about cloud computing lately, but its own data center doesn't match the size of its ambitions. So, where would the additional infrastructure come from? The clouds created by this question cleared up a bit today with the unveiling of Salesforce.com's new big buddy: Amazon Web Services.

Salesforce.com's been talking a lot about cloud computing lately, but its own data center doesn't match the size of its ambitions. So, where would the additional infrastructure come from? The clouds created by this question cleared up a bit today with the unveiling of Salesforce.com's new big buddy: Amazon Web Services.Salesforce.com announced today its "Force.com for Amazon Web Services" will leverage the "database, logic, and user interface features of Force.com and the storage and compute capabilities of Amazon S3 and Amazon EC2 services." What that means is Salesforce.com is looking for developers to use its platform to write applications that are partly hosted by Salesforce.com, partly hosted by Amazon's server and storage systems. Salesforce.com says developers' apps will be able to "seamlessly span both clouds," but exactly how that will work remains, er, cloudy to me.

Salesforce.com did explain it will have a toolkit for developers that makes the API for Amazon's hosted storage service (S3) available within Salesforce's Apex code. Developers will be able to add, remove, and modify Amazon S3 objects as needed by their applications. The use of Amazon's S3 services might appeal to developers building Force.com apps that require the storage of images, videos, and other big files.

Another offering is a toolkit that lets developers extend their Force.com applications with existing programming languages, such as PHP or Ruby, or pre-existing executables and libraries, to run in the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), Amazon's hosted server service that lets you use only the computing power you need on any given day.

There's still much to be answered here, including how much and to whom a developer or independent software vendor would pay in this Salesforce.com/Amazon co-hosting scenario. But the partnership does show that Salesforce.com sees Amazon as a way to solve some of its infrastructure issues as it tries to become more of a "cloud computing" provider.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
IT Careers: 10 Industries with Job Openings Right Now
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  5/27/2020
Commentary
How 5G Rollout May Benefit Businesses More than Consumers
Joao-Pierre S. Ruth, Senior Writer,  5/21/2020
News
IT Leadership in Education: Getting Online School Right
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  5/20/2020
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
The State of IT & Cybersecurity Operations 2020
The State of IT & Cybersecurity Operations 2020
Download this report from InformationWeek, in partnership with Dark Reading, to learn more about how today's IT operations teams work with cybersecurity operations, what technologies they are using, and how they communicate and share responsibility--or create risk by failing to do so. Get it now!
Video
Current Issue
Key to Cloud Success: The Right Management
This IT Trend highlights some of the steps IT teams can take to keep their cloud environments running in a safe, efficient manner.
Slideshows
Flash Poll